Monarchy. To be continued?

Having arrived early in London, I rushed along to see the family. The courtyard, gardens and front of the palace were empty, the guards silent. I hoped to have some private time with Aunty Victoria and my wish was granted. I travelled all the way from remote Edinburgh, bridging the aftermath of the Referendum to lay the pro arguments, like puzzle pieces, at Victoria’s feet. She smiled, appreciative of my efforts and amused. ‘No, my child’ she said ‘The Queen never lets go of that which she cares about deeply’. ‘Oh’ I looked her in the eye ‘in that we are very much alike, Her Majesty’. It was one of the most intimate moments I have ever had with Mother England. I felt like in the eye of a tornado, in the midst of European transformation which Scotland, on the physical platform, had brought to light. I knew there was no going back. I looked away.

Indeed, Victoria and Albert spent some of their most beautiful times together in Scotland; that part of the Empire had always been very dear to the royal family. I have always known it but that day, feeling Victoria’s heart I understood it on a primal level. Yet again, the form of the Yes campaign revealed itself to me as immature and inadequate. In September 2014 Scotland’s mad rush away from its ‘oppressors’ backfired. Have we not understood that independence is as much a political affair as it is a matter of spirit and mind of the nation? How independent in thought Scotland really is?

I felt it could only dislodge itself from British history by respecting its position in the royal heart, not rejecting it. And it is with the royal family that the new born nation will need to cut the cords with, transforming the form of the monarchy as we know it forever. Counter-intuitive for the wild, rough and determined Scots perhaps, that separation will ask for gentleness. For matters of the heart run in our families, in our blood lines.

Despite the biological continuity of the royal lineage, the Windsor (factually House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha) dynasty, with its weak men and common women, has no one to replace Elizabeth II who would embody her clarity and adherence to the code of conduct. Britain’s affair with royalty will only further drain the country’s resources and stall its progress. The British monarchy has really nowhere to go but into radical transformation. Whether it will do so kicking (with people’s revolution) or with dignity (people’s evolution) the next decade will show.

For the first time however it is people who have the cosmic forces aligned with their voice and choice. I am not sure if society is aware of how much power it had already gathered. If this power is not contained and adequately navigated towards the desired results, Britain might end up in civil war – the current state of its subconscious is a perfect match for that. It is enough for a ‘terrorist attack’ to hit London that will act as a trigger and an excuse.

Then again perhaps this is exactly what is needed to ‘clear the air’ before any substantial change can occur. May we tread with courage.

Further inspiration: Progressive Monarchy terminated