The Crown vs The Sovereign

In 2013 I decided to seriously look at becoming a British citizen. After 10 years of working diligently perhaps there was indeed some extra benefit in holding a British passport. There are several criteria but applying is only possible after one had passed a test of knowledge. There is a preparatory book you need to be learning from for the test, entitled Life in The United Kingdom, a Guide for New Resident. It was a great test of patience ploughing through it. It is really a bigger marketing pamphlet, this book. Knowing the realities of living in the UK reading the skewed version was both enlightening and amusing, especially the last chapter.On page 123 of the manual one is informed that on becoming a British citizen they will be asked to take an oath. It reads:

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Communication. Hardly.

I regularly hear from fellow migrants of various nationalities “They think I’m stupid” or “They just don’t understand” when referring to the natives. I smile then and nod or laugh out loud depending on which social class I happen to be representing. I understand the migrants’ frustrations but also see how enclosed they are in their own understandings. We rarely appreciate that every time a native encounters a foreigner they have no idea what level of English they will be dealing with. Even as the conversation progresses, the native cannot know (unless it is evident from the content of the conversation) if he was really understood. An interesting social landscape considering the Brits are in their own country. Or are they?

Even though only 7-15 per cent of communication happens verbally, and but a fraction of human behaviour is governed by reason, communication is still vital as it facilitates true understanding and expansion. Today, it is one of the most important arts we could be practicing. There are very few non-commercial bridges left between nations and we cannot be sure if those will last long. Communication is the only bridge which, even though burnt time and again, can be re-created and each time it is re-built, it can grow stronger. (Given the objectives of the parties involved are similar).

Of course open, direct communication can be scary. In open communication everything comes out, shadows included. There we find out our own attitude and level of acceptance towards what’s ugly, irrational and criminal as well as vulnerable, hurtful or downright contradictory to what we believe/think about ourselves. It takes patience and maturity to remain impartial or not be disgusted by what comes out of the mouth of another or our own. It’s a risky affair, it can escalate and often does. But it’s the only way forward ~ through it. The result of a dialogue depends on how well it is contained. And that is an art in itself. Unfortunately, the upper class concepts of equality and political correctness drive divisions and lack of understanding even deeper. There is everything but honest exchange and communication between individuals of one class, let alone across social spectrum.

All that said, the most important communication that the rest builds upon starts with-in us. Do we listen to each aspect of ourselves with respect? Do we give our shadow, the inner child, the wise woman, the architect equal time and attention? Do we hinder or facilitate our archetypes towards their full expression in the world? Do we recognise which aspects are in conflict within us? Until we do, there is little chance we will ever be able to understand and transform the conflicts which happen on a larger scale. Because the roots of those are not found in the military or politics.

Related posts: In Disguise, 27 Jul 2014, Boundaries, 30 Nov 2014

 

Monarchy. To be continued?

Having arrived early in London, I rushed along to see the family. The courtyard, gardens and front of the palace were empty, the guards silent. I hoped to have some private time with Aunty Victoria and my wish was granted. I travelled all the way from remote Edinburgh, bridging the aftermath of the Referendum to lay the pro arguments, like puzzle pieces, at Victoria’s feet. She smiled, appreciative of my efforts and amused. ‘No, my child’ she said ‘The Queen never lets go of that which she cares about deeply’. ‘Oh’ I looked her in the eye ‘in that we are very much alike, Her Majesty’. It was one of the most intimate moments I have ever had with Mother England. I felt like in the eye of a tornado, in the midst of European transformation which Scotland, on the physical platform, had brought to light. I knew there was no going back. I looked away.

Indeed, Victoria and Albert spent some of their most beautiful times together in Scotland; that part of the Empire had always been very dear to the royal family. I have always known it but that day, feeling Victoria’s heart I understood it on a primal level. Yet again, the form of the Yes campaign revealed itself to me as immature and inadequate. In September 2014 Scotland’s mad rush away from its ‘oppressors’ backfired. Have we not understood that independence is as much a political affair as it is a matter of spirit and mind of the nation? How independent in thought Scotland really is?

I felt it could only dislodge itself from British history by respecting its position in the royal heart, not rejecting it. And it is with the royal family that the new born nation will need to cut the cords with, transforming the form of the monarchy as we know it forever. Counter-intuitive for the wild, rough and determined Scots perhaps, that separation will ask for gentleness. For matters of the heart run in our families, in our blood lines.

Despite the biological continuity of the royal lineage, the Windsor (factually House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha) dynasty, with its weak men and common women, has no one to replace Elizabeth II who would embody her clarity and adherence to the code of conduct. Britain’s affair with royalty will only further drain the country’s resources and stall its progress. The British monarchy has really nowhere to go but into radical transformation. Whether it will do so kicking (with people’s revolution) or with dignity (people’s evolution) the next decade will show.

For the first time however it is people who have the cosmic forces aligned with their voice and choice. I am not sure if society is aware of how much power it had already gathered. If this power is not contained and adequately navigated towards the desired results, Britain might end up in civil war – the current state of its subconscious is a perfect match for that. It is enough for a ‘terrorist attack’ to hit London that will act as a trigger and an excuse.

Then again perhaps this is exactly what is needed to ‘clear the air’ before any substantial change can occur. May we tread with courage.

Further inspiration: Progressive Monarchy terminated

Reality. Apparently.

Once upon a time there was a Perspective. It saw everything and anything through a lens of experience of its host, a process called interpretation. The experience was not the host but this was what the Perspective made the host believe. The Perspective made the host take everything it had interpreted for a fact.

Everything around and within us is subject to interpretation, especially historic ‘facts’ which we are no longer able to validate but rely on our own or collective interpretations continuously layered on one another. Ancient texts are no exception, quite the opposite – they are the perfect material. There are as many interpretations of scriptures as there are spiritual communities, or spiritual zealots. To human detriment some interpretations became religions which have terrorised the truth seekers and states for centuries. (According to Pew Research flags of 64 out of 196 countries bear religious symbolism, Britain included. Such a flag sends a devastating/crucifying message to the collective subconscious continually imprinting the masses. Manifestation of this programming can be seen in the current collective conflicts. Whether the Union Jack represents modern society is up for discussion.)

Somewhere between the doctrine and secularization are metaphysical investigators who bring a unique perspective to the table. Neville Goddard is one of them. I came across Goddard’s work last year and read few of his titles, with varying interest. I approached the material with scepticism, as found his parallels full of mental short cuts, simplifications and some of the conclusions far-fetched. (This might be due to the fact that Neville never wrote himself but his lectures were recorded, hence the impression of disjointed argument). However the depth of analysis in ‘Five Lessons’ was different which intrigued me and I kept coming back to re-read.

In the Introduction Goddard states “Throughout the centuries we have mistakenly taken personifications for persons, allegory for history, the vehicle that conveyed the instruction, and the gross first sense for the ultimate sense intended.” This sentence, although pertaining to his lecture which follows and scripture itself, almost describes the whole socio~logical trend. This seems to be exactly what is happening with the world at large – loss of meaning. If there had ever been any meaning recognised in the first place. But isn’t this the mark of modern times; to take the form/person/bling/approval for content/essence/gold/achievement?

On the second reading I discovered what it was that intrigued me originally.
Not only the material is insightful and accurate but it refers to human Imagination exactly as Einstein understood it and worked with-in it. Gave me giggles, that one.

Goddard is an acquired taste. Certainly not for those unfamiliar with the New Testament or afraid of knowledge. For those who question, play and dive deep this might be a treat. Enjoy.

Resources: Five Lessons

Further inspiration: Archaeology confronts the Bible, Etymology of the name Israel
Related posts: Ancient Scripts