The Crown vs The Sovereign

In 2013 I decided to seriously look at becoming a British citizen. After 10 years of working diligently perhaps there was indeed some extra benefit in holding a British passport. There are several criteria but applying is only possible after one had passed a test of knowledge. There is a preparatory book you need to be learning from for the test, entitled Life in The United Kingdom, a Guide for New Resident. It was a great test of patience ploughing through it. It is really a bigger marketing pamphlet, this book. Knowing the realities of living in the UK reading the skewed version was both enlightening and amusing, especially the last chapter.On page 123 of the manual one is informed that on becoming a British citizen they will be asked to take an oath. It reads:

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Boundaries

This week Mr Cameron introduced what might be one of the healthiest and most progressive policies of his reign thus far. In his statement on 28 November 2014 he declared a number of planned restrictions for the migrants to Britain. What motivates Mr Cameron, whether it is upcoming elections, his or Britain’s reputation in EU or genuine interest in matters of the country, is of little importance at this stage. If his rhetoric is followed by carefully implemented policies, they might initiate a restoration of balance between countries of Europe and beyond.

Cameron’s insights however come a decade too late and it’s optimistic or naïve to say that perhaps the statement given is a way of reflecting back on Britain’s own arrogance. Germany, together with other countries, ensured restrictions on free movement of migrants and ‘buffer’ period for the newly joint EU members in 2004. Britain hadn’t. It has now paid a fair price for its own short-sightedness and greed – in benefits. I’d call it mutual, if unequal, exploitation. For maybe that was the initial premise, to let migrants fill the economic gap at the lowest level, at which the Brits were too lazy or ‘educated’ (but not skilled) to perform? Or perhaps just a slice of grandeur, convoluted generosity of a wealthy Western country which today, Britain had ceased to be.

I’m writing this from a perspective (aka identification) of a white, educated migrant who arrived in England even before her native country was part of EU. I took full advantage of the opportunity and it served me well. In the meantime I observed workers in factories working for less than a minimum wage, disadvantaged because they could not communicate in English, reliant on manipulations of one manager who could. Alongside I experienced the other side of the coin as a public service interpreter and watched how the system was abused by those who came to UK, sometimes 6 months before, without a word of English but high expectations of the state to provide for them. That goes for people from non-, old- and new-EU member states and many from the ex-Commonwealth countries. Britain had to become a host for parasites before it finally looked at what’s going on in its insides. About time. That is why I welcome Mr Cameron’s proposal. The move, if it goes ahead will not only let Britain learn its own, true boundary but could also improve opportunities and conditions for those who work in this country, both migrants and natives.

How Scotland and Wales participate (or not) in the immigration game might define their future. These two are very different from what is represented as England, in mentality, geopolitics, attitude and social make up. It seems that Scotland was not serious enough about Independence but it is within Divine law that no Dream will ever descend on Earth if practicalities are not prepared. On the ground, in administration and infrastructure Scotland was not prepared to go it alone without substantial damage to itself. Mr Salmond’s bravado failed to convince the Cosmos his intention of independence was indeed a dream, not a fantasy.

However, it will now become clear if Scotland has what it takes to keep going and inspiring others or if Referendum 2014 was just a pre-mature ejaculation of enthusiasm. Fireworks are spectacular but short-lived; the real work is to keep the fire burning until enough of Spirit gathers to birth an independent thought which will then sponsor Its country on every level, practicalities first. Then asserting boundaries, not division, will become relevant.

Related post: Political Projections 10 August 2014, Systemic Balance, 24 August 2014